Kindara the ginger kiwi

Department of Conservation —  20/04/2015

By Emma Bean, Rainbow Springs Kiwi Encounter

Being a red head myself, I immediately took a shine to the ginger kiwi chick, Kindara, who came into my care at Rainbow Springs Kiwi Encounter as an Operation Nest Egg, five months ago.

Recently, I made an special extra effort to be at his release into the wild.

Kindara the ginger kiwi.

Kindara the ginger kiwi

As soon as he hatched, I realised Kindara was a special chick. Even though his feathers were still wet from the hatching process, I could see he had unique feather colouring. It was only when Kindara dried off and fluffed up that I saw just how beautifully auburn he was!

The team at Rainbow Springs Kiwi Encounter have hatched over 1400 kiwi chicks and, while we’ve had some with slightly red feathers before, none had been ginger like this!

Emma with Kindara as a chick and at his release.

Emma with Kindara from hatching to release

I was happy to see he gained fame online. I reckon there must have been quite a few other gingers who felt a special connection to Kindara too!

Kindara’s unique colouring compared with another chick Radiata.

Kindara’s unique colouring compared with another chick

The next step in Kindara’s journey was to be taken to the Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary. Here, while protected by their predator proof fence, he was able to gain his stoat-proof weight.

All along the way he has been supported by his sponsor, Tauhara College.

Kindara with students from Tauhara College.

Kindara with students from Tauhara College

Kindara was released back into the Karioi Rāhui, an ecological restoration project on the southern slopes of Mt Ruapehu. This is where he was taken from as an egg.

Kindara meets the public at Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary.

Kindara meets the public at Wairakei Golf + Sanctuary

In addition to being big enough to defend himself against stoats (his number one predator), he has the further protection of 600 DOC 200 traps within the rāhui.

The traps are part of a joint initiative between DOC and Ngāti Rangi, which aims to re-establish kiwi on the mountain.

Tauhara College student Hayleigh Pine releases Kindara into the Karioi Rāhui.

Tauhara College student Hayleigh Pine releases Kindara into in Rangataua Forest

Now that Kindara’s home I hope he finds a mate. It will be exciting to see if he and his future partner will produce more ginger chicks!

Would you like to sponsor a kiwi?

If you are interested in learning more about how you can help save kiwi, or to make a secure online donation, please visit the Kiwis for kiwi website.

If you are specifically interested in supporting the work of the Kiwi Encounter please visit the Rainbow Springs website.

3 responses to Kindara the ginger kiwi

  1. 

    Kindara STAY AWAY FROM 1080

    • 

      Kia ora Neville. Kiwi are at very low risk from 1080. We have monitored hundreds of kiwi both through and after aerial 1080 operations – some for well over a year – and we have never lost a single bird to 1080. It might also be worth mentioning that 1080, which breaks down naturally in soil within weeks, was last used in Karioi Rahui in August 2009.

  2. 

    wonderful story. Stay safe little one.