Jobs at DOC: Te Tiriti o Waitangi

Department of Conservation —  15/05/2015

This year marks the 175th anniversary of the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

To acknowledge this we’ve asked staff from across DOC to share with us a little bit about their relationship with Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Yuin Khai Foong, Marine Ranger—Maungauika

Yuin Khai Foong, Marine Ranger.

Yuin Khai Foong, Marine Ranger

When was the first time you went on a marae?

1992.

Hangi, kina or tītī (mutton bird).  Which would you prefer to eat and why?

Hangi – warm and earthy with unique flavours – really sums up for me Maori hospitality. What really sets it off though is the sense of community around organising a hangi and the hospitality of being invited to a hangi.

Who is your favourite historical Maori hero and why?

Willie Apiata. A humble, courageous, strong Kiwi. All values I think of when I think of Māori people.

With unlimited budget, what conservation activity would you create to celebrate Waitangi 175?

Set up 175 marine reserves.

What’s your favourite Maori word and why?

Tohorā. Because I love whales.

Tohorā/Southern right whale.  Photo: Nyla Strachan.

Tohorā

Trish Sutton.

Trish Sutton.

Trish Sutton, Administration Officer—Whakatane

When was the first time you went on a marae?

A very long time ago. I have been on marae several times over the years since—for hui, wananga, marae DIY and training.

Hangi, kina or tītī (mutton bird).  Which would you prefer to eat and why?

Hangi. I love the earthy flavours.

Who is your favourite historical Maori hero and why?

Tamati Kruger, for his vision for Te Urewera (not really historical but very much a history in the making—right now).

What’s a highlight from your work with our Treaty Partners?

Interaction of cultures and mutual respect.

With unlimited budget, what conservation activity would you create to celebrate Waitangi 175? 

A contemporary and compassionate movie based on the original signing (clearly outlining what each party thought they were signing) of Te Tiriti for all New Zealanders to watch—perhaps even an educational one for schools.

What’s your top tip for including DOC’s Te Tiriti responsibilities in your work? 

Try to remember what and where ‘giving effect to Te Tiriti’ fits in with all of our work.

What do the principles of the Treaty mean to you?

Working in partnership, with meaning and cultural awareness.

What’s your favourite Maori word and why?

Ata Marie or Rangi Marie—a lovely greeting, sounds beautiful and conveys a peaceful message to the receiver.

Laying a hangi. Photo: Sarah Stewart | CC BY 2.0 | http://ow.ly/MVAZw

Hangi

Reg Kemper.

Reg Kemper

Reg Kemper, Partnerships Director—Wellington

When was the first time you went on a marae?

1987, my first year of DOC—it was to attend a ‘Project Waitangi’ training course.

Hangi, kina or tītī (mutton bird). Which would you prefer to eat and why?

Not really a fan of kina, although I love all other seafood and there is enough oil in a mutton bird to run your car, so hangi is the winner. Yum.

Who is your favourite historical Maori hero and why?

George Nepia—I am a rugby nut.

What’s a highlight from your work with our Treaty Partners?

Iwi support for species translocations in Fiordland. Also, watching settled iwi in the Lower North Island using conservation to grow iwi capability and achieve their tribal vision.

With unlimited budget, what conservation activity would you create to celebrate Waitangi 175?

I went to the 150th celebrations in Waitangi and it was just awesome. I would love to see that again.

What’s your top tip for including DOC’s Te Tiriti responsibilities in your work? 

Stop thinking of it as a section of the legislation and think of it as a way of working to support iwi goals and aspirations through conservation.

What’s your favourite Maori word and why?

Mana because it of what it means—it means mana! And aroha—it’s just the right way to express that special sentiment.

Fern in the shape of a heart. Photo © Sabine Bernert.

Aroha/love

Annette Richards.

Annette Richards

Annette Richards, Fisheries Ranger—Taupō

When was the first time you went on a marae?

2014.

Hangi, kina or tītī (mutton bird). Which would you prefer to eat and why?

Hangi because it’s yummy, and I am scared to try the others.

Who is your favourite historical Maori hero and why?

Pania of the Reef, because she was from the water and was an independent women.

What’s a highlight from your work with our Treaty Partners?

Seeing and feeling through their eyes.

With unlimited budget, what conservation activity would you create to celebrate Waitangi 175?

I’d work with local iwi to establish and protect a network of medicinal and edible native plant collections, providing interpretation and way finding signage and cultivation information, and incorporate this into recreation.

What’s your top tip for including DOC’s Te Tiriti responsibilities in your work? 

Consideration and consultation.

What do the principles of the Treaty mean to you?

Partnership, good faith, respect, consideration.

What’s your favourite Maori word and why?

Aroha because it means love.

Maria Deutsch (centre).

Maria Deutsch (centre)

Maria Deutsch.

Maria Deutsch

Maria Deutsch, Outreach and Education Coordinator—Nelson

When was the first time you went on a marae?

About 20 years ago. It was Waikawa Marae in Waitohi/Picton as a yellow belt in Seido Karate. Each year the entire karate whānau would spend three days on the marae. It was a fantastic introduction to tikanga, kawa and the bicultural history of the area.

What’s a highlight from your work with our Treaty Partners?

Being one of the key tutors on Tauira Kaitiaki Taiao/Māori Cadetship. To see those young Māori people with leadership potential, and assisting them to grow into leaders and kaitiaki, was both rewarding and inspiring.

With unlimited budget, what conservation activity would you create to celebrate Waitangi 175?

Following on from the previous question, I would roll out the Tauira Kaitiaki Taiao program nationwide and make it accessible to all iwi and hapu.

Imagine a world where each year fifty young Māori leaders join us in our efforts for conservation and in building an ecological sustainable future.

What’s your top tip for including DOC’s Te Tiriti responsibilities in your work? 

Be proud to be part of a government department that is leading the way in requiring a proactive approach for working with our Treaty partners, and has moved beyond this into a true partnership space.

Find out how it is done and join in. For those involved in amazing partner projects—share and celebrate so we all can learn from it and keep growing this rich and rewarding space.

What’s your favourite Maori word and why?

Ngākau Māhaki. It describes for me an attitude of humble generosity when dealing with each other that leaves the ego behind and truly opens up to the other person.