Archives For conservation

“It sat down, it sat down!” This is the exclamation of an excited birder looking for banded dotterel/pohowera nests. It’s breeding season and its time figure out if our new predator cages will work to help boost nesting success.

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November 20 marks the 70th anniversary of the rediscovery of the takehē – we take a look back at seven decades of progress, preservation and recovery.

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Meet one of our Senior Biodiversity Rangers Ali! She’s worked with some of New Zealand’s most unique species including whio, kiwi and short tailed bats. We asked on Instagram if you had any questions for Ali about her work and we were overwhelmed with the amount of questions we received!

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A partnership between our staff and Marlborough District Council (MDC) saw a traditional teachers’ workshop evolve into something a little bit special this year. Community Ranger Wendy Sullivan explains how Marlborough students taught their teachers a thing or two about conservation.

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New Zealand’s wildlife is in crisis with more than 4,000 of our species threatened or at risk. These species include those that you may be familiar with, like the Māui dolphin and Kakapo, and those that are lesser well known including fungi, snails, insects, lizards and fish. All these species are part of what makes New Zealand unique.

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For nearly 70 years a group of passionate and dedicated people have been working hard to ensure takahē are never again considered extinct. Although the people have changed, the mission of returning takahē to the wild – having takahē roaming the native grasslands of mainland New Zealand – has always remained the same. Since rediscovery in 1948, Takahē Recovery has taken many forms and exists as one of the longest standing and progressive conservation stories in the world.

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During two weeks in May, seven juvenile shore plover/tūturuatu were translocated to Waikawa Island off Mahia Peninsula. This was the last of two translocation for the year. Local biodiversity ranger Helen Jonas explains what’s involved in keeping this population of rare birds going. 

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