Archives For dogs

Dogs Day Out event educating dog owners on seven simple steps to share the beach with our precious coastal taonga

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Beaches are great places to roam with dogs, but uncontrolled dogs can disturb or harm our wildlife. To avoid this, here are some simple steps dog owners can take to lead the way as ambassadors for our wildlife.

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As Conservation Week approaches, Marine Science Advisor Laura shares tips for managing dogs near wildlife at the beach.

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Today’s photo of the week is of rodent detection dogs Tike and Cody, during a working day in Ipipiri/Eastern Bay of Islands.

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DOC Ranger Caraline Abbott discusses dogs and the impact on conservation in the Rotorua District.

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For the first time in over a decade, a dog is back on Raoul Island—this time to help clear the island of noxious weeds.

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By Kath Inwood, Partnerships Ranger, Nelson

The Motueka sandspit is an internationally significant site for shorebirds, providing roosting and nesting space for variable oystercatchers and banded dotterel, and temporary lodgings for the bar-tailed godwit. Being so close to town, however, it is a popular spot for Motueka dog owners to walk their dogs.

A variable oystercatcher.

A variable oystercatcher

Ranger Ross with some dogs.

Ranger Ross and some of the dogs

To improve awareness of the birds in the area, we got together with Tasman District Council and Birds New Zealand to try out an Australian idea – the Dog’s Breakfast. This event provides dog owners an opportunity to learn about the birds of the foreshore and sandspit over a bacon and egg butty (sandwich).

Around 50 dog walkers turned out to breakfast with their dogs over a two and a half hour period on Saturday 8 March.

With the smell of sizzling bacon in the background, David Melville from Birds New Zealand explained that variable oystercatchers and banded dotterel are key inhabitants of the sandspit area, along with the better-known bar-tailed godwits, who make the 11,000km flight between New Zealand and Alaska.

The crowd at the Dog's breakfast.

The crowd gathers for the dog’s breakfast

The purpose of the breakfast was to raise awareness of dog owners about the significance of this area for shorebirds, and to enable them to be more informed about how they can minimise the disturbance to wildlife, while enjoying the benefits of an area such as this to walk their dogs.