Archives For International Year of Biodiversity

When I was studying marketing at university one of my lecturers said, “if you want to communicate a message simply and effectively, ask a young person what they would say”. I was reminded of that as I watched this year’s winning entries for The Outlook for Someday – sustainability film challenge for young people. The winners’ ability to get their messages across in simple but creative ways is really inspiring.

DOC sponsored a special biodiversity award for The Outlook for Someday challenge and at a ceremony in November two teams from Newmarket Primary School in Auckland were announced as the joint winners of that award.

One of the winning films is ‘The Kaitiaki Children and the Birds’. It’s about a group of young people who protect birds and share a message that we can all become nature’s guardians. The judges said the film uses “a wonderful and creative mix of media.”

Newmarket Primary School students and makers of The Kaitiaki Children and the Birds, with Auckland Mayor Len Brown and Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman.

Newmarket Primary School students and makers of The Kaitiaki Children and the Birds, with Auckland Mayor Len Brown and Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman.

Watch The Kaitiaki Children and the Birds.

The other winning film, ‘Sam the Superworm’ is about saving our food and tells the story of how everyone, including a small stripy worm, can help protect nature. The judges said this film is “a fabulous tale about taking action on behalf of biodiversity in an urban environment.”

Newmarket Primary School students and makers of Sam the Superworm collect their award

Newmarket Primary School students and makers of Sam the Superworm collect their award

Watch Sam the Superworm.

The winning films are showing on TVNZ 6 each night this week (from 13-17 December) on Freeview or TiVo channel 6, and SKY or Telstra channel 16. Each programme will be shown at 6:30pm and again at 8:30pm.

To enter The Outlook for Someday challenge, young New Zealanders have to make a sustainability-related film that’s up to 5 minutes long, using any camera. People can enter as teams or individuals.

Entries for the film challenge came from all over New Zealand and were made by individuals and teams from primary, intermediate and secondary schools as well as tertiary institutions.

Well done to everyone who competed in this year’s film challenge and I’m sure next year’s entries will be  just as strong.

Auckland’s giant kākāpō – named Kiri te Kākāpō by Verran Primary School – has become a star attraction at the 10th meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) which began in Japan this week.

 

Kiri te Kākāpō sporting her lovely plumage.

Auckland's giant kākāpō 'Kiri te Kākāpō' sporting her lovely plumage of conservation messages

 

Our man in Nagoya Andrew Bignell (DOC’s International Relations manager and head of the NZ government delegation at the Japanese meeting), reports that even while the team was unpacking the bird people were stopping to talk and take photographs!

“Having the kākāpō here has been a wonderful start and has given a morale boost to the delegation to see a bit of home displayed in such a prominent position.”

 

Curious onlookers stop to check out Kiri te Kākāpō in Japan.

Curious onlookers stop to check out Kiri te Kākāpō at DOC's display at the 10th meeting of the CBD in Japan

 

Kiri and her plumage of messages is the heart of DOC’s display at the CBD’s fair showing the best examples from around the world of International Year of Biodiversity education and awareness activities.

On Thursday, the bird will take centre stage at a special ceremony in which the CBD’s executive secretary Dr Ahmed Djoghlaf will accept a selection of the more the 20,000 messages New Zealanders have composed.

Andrew will present Dr Djoghlaf with a beautiful kākāpō poster made for the Words on a Wing action by year 3 and 4 pupils from Auckland’s Albany Primary School.

How did a flightless parrot make it all the way to Japan?

Happily the wonderful team at Air NZ came to the rescue. They organised for Kiri to arrive in Nagoya in good time and in excellent nick. They’ll also fly her home again when the meeting finishes on the 29th.

 

The team at Air New Zealand pose with Kiri te Kākāpō.

The team at Air New Zealand form a scrum with Kiri te Kākāpō as a farewell before she sets off on her big OE

 

 

Kiri te Kākāpō is all wrapped up and loaded into the cargo hold for her flight to Japan.

Kiri te Kākāpō is all wrapped up and loaded into the cargo hold for her flight to Japan

 

While you’re still thinking about biodiversity, check out the song Verran Primary School wrote for Kiri.

Te Papa’s naming competition for the Wellington kākāpō

And the winner is…  “Mātārere” which means forerunner/harbinger. The winning entry came from a kākāpo fan in Norway who faxed her entry to Te Papa. Thanks to our brainy bird experts at ZEALANDIA, Te Papa, and DOC for serving as judges.

The winner of the competition was initially going to win an annual family pass to ZEALANDIA, but because she lives a little too far away to get to enjoy that prize she’ll receive a bag of goodies from Te Papa instead.

Find out more

Words on a Wing and the giant kākāpō project

Te Papa’s naming competition

Great to see all the photos that were entered in the New Zealand Biodiversity: Captured photo comp. 

I was impressed that so many of my relatives had such star qualities (I thought it was just us kākāpō that did well in the limelight). There were photos with tui, fantails, albatrosses, heron, blue ducks, paradise ducks…and one that’s a reminder of how hard it can be to be a bird – a yellow-eyed penguin giving a dog a piece of its mind. And those are just the photos that featured my bird mates. 

We had top-notch judges for the competition – Craig Potton, Kim Westerskov, and Norman Heke – and from what I understand they had a pretty hard job determining the winners. 

Top winner was Mandy Hague’s photo of a heron with impeccable table manners eating a small shrimp. 

Mandy Hague's winning photo - heron eating shrimp.

Mandy Hague's winning photo - heron eating shrimp

 Runner up was Dillon Anderson’s photo of a blue duck in mid stream. 

Dillon Anderson's runner up photo - blue duck.

Dillon Anderson's runner up photo - blue duck

Thanks to NZ National Commission for UNESCO, NIWA, and Forest & Bird sponsoring the photo comp with DOC. The photo comp was a great way to give NZ wildlife starring roles during International Year of Biodiversity. 

Want to see the photos up close? They’re up at ZEALANDIA between now and 18 October 2010. 

Yellow-eyed penguin, angler and dog – photo by Peter Langlands.

Yellow-eyed penguin, angler and dog – photo by Peter Langlands

And the winners are…

Overall Winner

Mandy Hague 

Overall Runner-up

Dillon Anderson 

Land and sky

Youth winners

1st place Merryn Giblin 

2nd place Rawiri Milne 

Adult winners

1st place Dillon Anderson 

2nd place Jason Blair 

Water

Youth winners

1st Emma Wilson 

2nd Merryn Giblin 

Adult winners

1st Mandy Hague 

2nd Alison Perkins 

People and biodiversity

Youth winners

1st Tikirau Hathaway 

2nd Skye Kelly 

Adult winners

1st Andy Maloney 

2nd Peter Langlands 

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