Archives For penguins

Sometimes our native species have it tough out there in the wild. This year large numbers of yellow-eyed penguin/hoiho chicks – natives of coastal Otago – have had a particularly challenging first few months of life.

Yellow-eyed penguin chick.

Yellow-eyed penguin chicks have thick fluffy feathers that they shed between three and four months old – which is about the age of this chick

Two of the 80 underweight chicks currently in the care of Penguin Place.

Two of the underweight chicks at Penguin Place

Every year in November/December yellow-eyed penguin chicks begin to hatch around the wild beaches of the Catlins, Otago Peninsula and North Otago.

There are often a few that are abandoned by their parents or aren’t well fed, and need to be removed from their nests. But this year a late breeding season and lack of fish to eat has meant a large number of chicks have gone hungry and many have died.

Fortunately, around 80 of these chicks and juveniles are now in the care of Penguin Place.

Penguin Place is a privately run conservation effort and tourism operation, funded through the guided tours they conduct. This project began in the mid 80’s as a family-run conservation project and nature tourism experience. They now carry out a range of conservation work including a research programme, trapping predators, providing safe nest boxes, restoring a stretch of coastline to prime penguin habitat, and rehabilitating sick and injured penguins in its penguin hospital.

Penguin Place’s Lisa King (at rear) and DOC’s Andrea Crawford, look on as the chicks are rounded up for their dinner.

Penguin Place’s Lisa King (at rear) and DOC’s Andrea Crawford, look on as the chicks are rounded up for their dinner

Throughout the breeding season, a small team of DOC rangers and volunteers monitor the penguin nesting grounds, conducting health checks of the chicks to make sure they are well fed and gaining weight.

Aviva Stein (Zoologist), Leith Thomson (Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust Ranger), Eiren Sweetman (DOC volunteer) and Guy Brannigan (DOC Trainee Ranger), weighing yellow-eyed penguin chicks in the Catlins.

Aviva Stein (Zoologist), Leith Thomson (Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust Ranger), Eiren Sweetman (DOC volunteer) and Guy Brannigan (DOC Trainee Ranger), weighing yellow-eyed penguin chicks in the Catlins

Those that are showing signs of starvation or other ailments are removed from the nest where needed and taken to safe havens like Penguin Place till they fatten up and are ready for release.

DOC Trainee Ranger Guy Brannigan with four underweight yellow-eyed penguin chicks in the Catlins, on their way to Penguin Place. These chicks lost up to 1kg and would have died before fledging if left in the wild.

DOC Trainee Ranger Guy Brannigan with four underweight yellow-eyed penguin chicks, on their way to Penguin Place. These chicks lost up to 1 kg and would have died before fledging if left in the wild

Penguin Place guide Tama Taiti hand feeding one of the juvenile penguins.

Penguin Place guide Tama Taiti hand feeding one of the juvenile penguins

Feeding 80 hungry beaks is a big job. It takes two keepers three hours twice a day to hand feed all of the penguin hospital’s current patients – and they’re consuming up to 80 kilos of fish per day! Plus, because they’re still growing, these young patients need fish that’s full of protein and other vitamins, preferably small whole fish with blood, guts and bones.

Thankfully some generous partners have come to the aid of Penguin Place this year. Talleys Nelson contributed an emergency supply of one tonne of pilchard; and seafood company Sanford Limited has just agreed to provide an ongoing donation of up to six tonnes per year.

DOC doesn’t run its own facilitates for providing the specialist care that’s needed to rehabilitate sick or injured wildlife. We work in partnership with a number of specialist organisations like Penguin Place, who have permits from DOC to care for native species. These organisations play a really important role in conservation. So next time you’re in Dunedin pop by, join a tour or make a donation, and show your support.

Fresh from a swim in the Penguin Place pool.

Fresh from a swim in the Penguin Place pool

Read more here: Fish needed for starving penguin chicks – 18 February 2014, DOC media release

This week’s photo shows an erect-crested penguin on New Zealand’s subantarctic Bounty Islands.

Erect-crested penguin. Photo: Tui de Roy. Copyright. DOC use only.

The image celebrates Seaweek 2014 (1–9 March 2014) — a national celebration of our marine environment with hundreds of events taking place around the country.

It also represents the wildlife now protected as a result of the three new subantarctic marine reserves established this week.

Photo copyright Tui de Roy | DOC use only

By Hamish Coghill, Department of Conservation Intern

The DOC Internship Programme is celebrating its fourth successful year as the interns near the end of an exciting summer. A major highlight of the National Office summer interns’ time at DOC was the opportunity to spend two days in the field on Kapiti Island. Hamish Coghill presents an overview of what the interns got up to while on Kapiti.

The interns on Kapiti Island with Ash, Pete and Shannan. Photo by Shannan Mortimer.

The Summer Interns of 2012/2013 with Ash, Pete and Shannan

The intrepid interns braved early starts to carpool up to the Kapiti Coast on a bright December morning to catch a morning ferry out to Kapiti Island.

After ambling through the dunes to the breakers upon a giant trailer behind a tractor, our boat pushed its way out into the channel between the mainland and the once-island fortress of Te Rauparaha.

Meeting us on the shore was DOC ranger, Genevieve Spargo (Gen), who welcomed us all ashore and arranged for our overnight stay in ranger accommodation. Providing an introduction to the island was a local iwi representative, who explained some of the Māori history of the island as well as introducing many of the rare and wonderful species that seem to exist on the island in abundance.

The interns listen to Ranger Eric talk about the feeding programme on the Island. Photo by Pete Hiemstra.

Listening to Eric talk about the feeding programme on the Island for the Hihi

While those members of the public on a day trip headed off up the tracks to the summit, the interns—accompanied by staff from DOC National Office, Arshdeep Singh (intern coordinator), Shannan Mortimer (Capability Development Advisor), and Peter Hiemstra (Geospatial Analyst)— who demonstrated that National Office softies aren’t ones to shy away from a bit of hard yacka, and got to work pruning back some of the overgrown foliage along one of the tracks. A beach cleanup later that day was also undertaken by the group, filling a number of large rubbish bags with various items.

With night closing in, the group was led by Gen to observe some of the local nocturnal wildlife. Attempts were made to locate a kiwi whose calls were heard close to the houses, but to no avail, and a little blue penguin nest that smelt like a sardine factory was also unfortunately without its occupiers. However, the group was lucky enough to see the return of a couple of the penguins from a hard day fishing at sea, as well as spotting a number of rare geckos lounging in the flax bushes.

Kereru spotted on Kapiti Island. Photo by Pete Hiemstra.

NZ wood pigeon/kereru

On the second day the group headed up the track to the summit of the island which teemed with rare native bird life including saddleback, kaka and kōkako. Along the way, DOC ranger Eric introduced us to his work in trying to support the very threatened and fragile population of hihi. This involved regular monitoring and provided what seemed a very popular food supplement in sugar water.

At the summit of the track we were treated to stunning views out across the Cook Strait to Marlborough and up the West Coast to Mt Taranaki. After descending from the summit of the island, the group made its way back to the ferry pick up point and said its goodbyes to the island staff after a wonderful stay, before making the trip back over across the channel to the Kapiti Coast and back home to Wellington.

Ranger Gen on Kapiti Island. Photo by Shannan Mortimer.

Ranger Gen on Kapiti Island