Our nature on the money

Department of Conservation —  16/06/2016

Last month, New Zealand’s new $20, $50 and $100 notes were introduced into circulation. We look at some of New Zealand’s special nature exchanging hands daily.

$5 – The flora and fauna of Campbell Island

Campbell Island is the most southerly of New Zealand’s subantarctic islands. It’s remote, rugged, windswept, and home to over six species of albatross. It became a nature reserve in 1954 and is known for its large wildflowers or megaherbs. One of these is the Campbell Island daisy (Pleurophyllum speciosum), also featured on the note.

The new $5 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

The new $5 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

 

A field of megaherbs on Campbell Island. Photo by the Royal New Zealand Navy (CC-by-2.0)

A field of megaherbs on Campbell Island. Photo by the Royal New Zealand Navy (CC-by-2.0)

In 2005, Campbell Island was declared rat free after years of eradication work by DOC and numerous other agencies. The collective time and expertise is now ensuring the survival of our native species on the island.

The featured yellow-eyed penguin/hoiho is one of these species. Unique to New Zealand, the yellow eyed penguin is one of the rarest penguins in the world. Monitoring, research, and intensive management of the species is carried out by community groups and DOC. During 2011, DOC scientists attached dataloggers to penguins at Stewart Island/Rakiura to record and learn about the depth, length and shape of their dives during one feeding trip in the sea nearby.

We can’t forget featured Aoraki/Mount Cook, New Zealand’s highest peak located in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park. The rugged land of ice and rock has 19 peaks over 3,000 meters and has a variety of walking and tramping tracks for walkers of all experience levels.

$10 – Blue on blue

Our blue ten dollar note features New Zealand’s endemic whio/blue duck. It is one of only four ducks species in the world that lives in fast flowing waterHabitat loss, introduction of predators and human disturbance have all played a role in the decline of blue duck/whio populations. DOC and Genesis Energy managing the Whio Forever programme, aiming to secure a future for the special birds. Threats to the whio and how to help can be found on the DOC website.

Whio on whakapapa river. Photo Mike Bodie

Whio on whakapapa river. Photo: Mike Bodie

The notes also features pineapple scrub (Dracophyllum Menziesii) and the kiokio (Blechnum novae-zelandiae), one of New Zealand’s fern species.

The new $10 banknote. Photo: Reserve Bank of New Zealand

The new $10 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand

$20 – Marlborough ties

One of New Zealand’s fastest birds features on our twenty dollar note, the kārearea or New Zealand falcon. The bird can reach speeds of over 100 km/h and catch prey larger than itself. The species is at-risk and it is estimated only 5,000 to 8,000 birds remain. Community groups such as Wingspan Birds of Prey Trust and Marlborough Falcon Conservation Trust are working to ensure the survival of our special bird of prey.

The new $20 banknote. Photo: Reserve Bank of New Zealand

The new $20 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand

The Marlborough rock daisy (Pachystegia insignis) appears in front of Tapuae-o-Uenuku, highest peak in the northeast of New Zealand’s South Island. The daisy is best found on the Kaikoura coast where it can be seen growing off many of the steep rocky bluffs.

$50 – The wattle of the kōkako

Our New Zealand fifty dollar note is the only banknote in the world to feature fungi. The blue mushroom (Entoloma hochstetteri) is called werewere-kōkako in māori as it resembles the blue wattle of the kōkako.

The kōkako (also featured) are another at-risk species, known for the clarity and volume of their song which carries far across the forest.

In the mid 1990s DOC and the Auckland Regional Council started a joint project to protect the remaining 21 North Island kōkako in the Hunua Ranges. The population has grown slowly with the protection of nests from predators, close monitoring of nesting birds and trans-locations. A census in 2015 found 55 kōkako pairs!

The new $50 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

The new $50 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

A female kōkako. Photo: Janice McKenna.

A female kōkako. Photo: Janice McKenna.

In the background we find Pureora Forest Park straddling the Hauhungaroa and Rangitoto ranges west of Lake Taupo and east of Te Kuiti. The park preserves the last remnants of extensive native podocarp forests that once covered most of the central North Island. When deep under the canopy of these ancient trees, it’s easy to imagine primeval New Zealand as it existed thousands of years ago.

$100 – The beauty in Fiordland

Last but not least, we have our one hundred dollar note featuring the South Island lichen moth, mohua and Eglinton Valley in Fiordland National Park.

The South Island lichen moth (or zebra moth) is known for it’s unique colouration and camouflage techniques within Fiordland beech forests.

 

The new $100 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

The new $100 banknote. Image: Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

Only found in the southern half of New Zealand, the mohua/yellowhead nests in tree holes, making it highly vulnerable to predators like possums, stoats and rats. A predator plague in 2000 drove the last mohua out of the Marlborough Sounds and caused population crashes in Canterbury, Otago, Southland and Fiordland. DOC’s battle for our birds programme this year aims to give birds such as the mohua another chance at survival through pest control operations.


It’s great to see our nature featured on our notes, but it’s hard to fit it all in! For an interactive and comprehensive look at our new money visit www.brightermoney.co.nz. 

 

3 responses to Our nature on the money

  1. 
    Rebecca Bell 16/06/2016 at 8:43 am

    Hey

    Your link is broken so I can’t share your post…

    Great blog 🙂

    Cheers, Beck

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