Biodiversity on your doorstep

Department of Conservation —  20/04/2018 — 1 Comment

Did you know you can find out what species live near you?

Thanks to our new, interactive biodiversity information tool you can explore up to date biodiversity data across New Zealand’s conservation land.

Our national biodiversity monitoring programme collects the data by recording both native and introduced species at about 1400 sites across New Zealand. About 280 sites are visited each year, and each site is visited every 5 years.

A DOC field team at a biodiversity monitoring site in the Molesworth. Photo: Jane Gosden.

A DOC field team at a biodiversity monitoring site in the Molesworth.
Photo: Jane Gosden

The programme collects loads of high quality data on the plants and animals present at each site. DOC and other government departments use this data for regional and national biodiversity assessments.

This new tool is designed to make the data readily available to the wider public.

Some of the things you can do with this tool:

• Find out what species live in an area of public conservation land near you
• See if a specific species has been found in your area,
• Find out where best to go and listen to the dawn chorus, or
• Find out where the best place to go hunting is.

This is for you!

With a click of your mouse

You can access all the data collected at the national monitoring sites here. Data are visually displayed in interactive maps and graphics.

Want to know what was observed at the northern end of Stewart Island? Easy! Simply, click on a site on the map.

Interactive map showing site R178 at the northern end of Stewart Island selected (red dot). A list of bird species observed during the daytime is part of the report.

Interactive map showing site R178 at the northern end of Stewart Island selected (red dot). A list of bird species observed during the daytime is part of the report

The information automatically pops up to show you:

• Detailed site information – land cover, altitude, canopy cover etc.
• Day-time bird records – how many/which species found during the day;
• Night-time bird records – how many/which species observed during the night;
• Mammal information – how many/which introduced mammals were present;
• Vegetation information – which plants were found, which weeds and how dominant they were; this part of the tool is currently still in development.

The tool also compares your site with the national average. Did your site have more or fewer native birds than most? Were possum numbers lower or higher?

The methods used for data collection are explained, so you know exactly what you are dealing with. If this still isn’t enough, you can request the detailed data for each site here.

It takes teamwork to measure the diameter of this very large beech tree at Lake Rotoro. Photo: Jane Gosden.

It takes teamwork to measure this large beech tree at Lake Rotoro.
Photo: Jane Gosden

This is just the beginning

The site-level tool is the first in a series of tools we are developing to make our biodiversity monitoring data more readily available. So watch this space! Next on the list are tools that summarise data by region and conservation area. We want to make sure that, when you want to know what biodiversity to expect on your travels, you can be well informed..

For now, happy exploring!

Explore biodiversity data for your area

One response to Biodiversity on your doorstep

  1. 

    This is a great way to find out what’s around our wee piece of paradise without having to get wet or cold.
    Thanks DoC for looking around our land for us
    Great for students limited in their study time
    – especially good for oldies who’s knees , hips etc may limit their looking around themselves
    , or the weather prevents it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s