Archives For Giveaways

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Thanks for all your comments telling us why you want this fantastic book. The giveaway is now closed and the winner (picked at random) is Cathy Brown.

For the last 15 months, retired DOC stalwart, Harry Broad, has been researching the history of Molesworth Station—New Zealand’s largest farm (now conservation land).

The result is a stunning book, created in association with photographer Rob Suisted and Craig Potton Publishing.

Book cover: Molesworth—Stories from New Zealand’s Largest High-Country Station.

Today, thanks to Craig Potton Publishing, we’ve got a signed copy to give away.

But first, let’s take a closer look at Molesworth…

The mystique of Molesworth

What is it about Molesworth that has seen it retain its fascination for the public over many years?

First, the scale is truly vast (180 000 hectares), being bigger in size than Stewart Island, and stretching almost from Hanmer to the top of the Awatere Valley.

'Like riding through a painting' is how one cyclist described cycling through Molesworth.

‘Like riding through a painting’ is how one cyclist described
cycling through Molesworth

It is largely mountainous country and the overwhelming impression as you travel through it is one of hugely imposing landscapes that dwarf its rivers and dominate the horizons.

The history of Molesworth

Molesworth has a fascinating history. The private lessees walked off the run in 1937, crippled by low wool prices, snowstorms that could decimate sheep flocks, and being overrun by rabbits.

The horses are being walked down the Driving Spur.

The herd comes down the Driving Spur—cattle steam merging with the mist

The Department of Lands and Survey deserves enduring credit for rebuilding the station into ecological and economic health.

They appointed the legendary Bill Chisholm as manager who, along with his wife Rachel, rejuvenated the ruined landscape.

But Bill wasn’t big on public access, and for years the station was off limits.

An early morning start at the Yarra Hut, with stars still in the sky.

Early morning at the Yarra Hut

In 1987 Molesworth Station was finally opened to the public for a limited season—to drive through the main valley of the Acheron.

Eighteen years later, in 2005, Molesworth became public conservation land—managed by the Department of Conservation, in association with Landcorp Farming.

Today, the 8,000 strong cattle herd at Molesworth Station (the biggest herd in the country) is matched by the number of visitors each year—all enjoying the magic and mystique of this iconic high country reserve.

Visit Molesworth

When visiting Molesworth Station be prepared for a land of extremes. This vast landscape contains craggy scree-scarred mountains, wide river valleys and tussock slopes as well as tiny inconspicuous endangered plants. Its weather ranges from scorching summers to freezing snowy winters.

A rafting trip setting out down the Clarence River to the river mouth.

A rafting trip setting out down the Clarence River

Experience Molesworth for yourself during the open access periods, by car, bike, horse or on foot. Learn about the history from interpretation panels, camp outside the Cob Cottage, picnic by the mighty Acheron River or enjoy walks from 10 minutes to several days duration.

Win

If you’d like to win a copy of Molesworth: Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station, leave a comment on this post before 12 noon on Wednesday 27 November 2013 telling us why you want the book.

A winner will be selected at random and contacted by email.

Please note: We can only ship to New Zealand addresses.

Molesworth: Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station is valued at $69.99 and is available in most good bookstores; in many DOC visitor centres; and online at Craig Potton Publishing.


Learn more about Molesworth on the DOC website

History of Molesworth Station

Visiting Molesworth Station

We have had so many great comments telling us why you want this beautiful poster. The giveaway is now closed and the winning comment (picked at random) is from Anna Margaret. Em Scott also picks up a copy for naming all of the birds. Thanks for commenting.

If you’ve been following the Conservation Blog for a while you might remember that last November we gave away a copy of Buller’s Birds of New Zealand.

At the time I said that each painting was a masterpiece that I wanted to frame for my wall. I also said that pulling apart such a precious book for a piece of wall art would be criminal. This month I found the solution to my problem. May I present to you Native Birds of New Zealand—the poster.

The image used in this poster is a cromolithograph (c. 1900) by William Shaw Diedrich Schmidt. The birds in Schmidt’s work were based on the artwork of J.G Keulemans in Walter Buller’s A History of the Birds of New Zealand.

Buller's birds of New Zealand. The poster.

How gorgeous is that? How perfect would it look on my (ahem, I mean your) wall? How great would it be to win a copy?

Well, today you have a chance, thanks to Te Papa Press.

All you need to do to be in with a shot of winning the Native Birds of New Zealand poster is to leave a comment on this post before 12 noon, Wednesday 23 October 2013, telling us why you want it. 

A winner will be selected at random and contacted by email.

For an extra chance to win (yes, that’s two copies of the poster we’re giving away), and a fun challenge for the dedicated bird lovers amongst us, who can name the most birds in the poster?

Good luck!


Unfortunately we can only post to New Zealand addresses.

The Native Birds of New Zealand poster (755mm x 449mm) is valued at $24.99 and is available to purchase from Te Papa (and their online store).

Thanks for all your comments telling us why you want this fantastic book. The giveaway is now closed and the winners (picked at random) are: Gloria Williams and Darryn Anderson.

New Zealand is blessed with some of the most remarkable natural landscapes on Earth. The most unique and iconic of these areas are set aside as national parks.

For the last few weeks I’ve loved having these special places in my living room, courtesy of the Natural History New Zealand produced television series Wild About New Zealand — made to celebrate the 125th anniversary of New Zealand’s first national park.

Tonight’s the last episode (8:30 pm, TV One) but you can continue your living room adventures with Gus in the book, Wild About New Zealand: A Guide to Our National Parks.

Cover of Wild About New Zealand.

Written by outdoor adventurer Gus Roxburgh and illustrated with magnificent photographs and bird’s-eye view maps, this is both an entertaining and comprehensive visitor’s guide as well as a stunning celebration of New Zealand’s amazingly diverse national parks.

And, here’s the bit you’ve been waiting for:

Thanks to Random House New Zealand, we’ve got copies to give away!

To be in to win leave a comment on this post before 12 noon on Thursday 10 October 2013, telling us why you want the book. Winners will be selected at random and contacted by email.

Please note: We can only ship to New Zealand addresses.

Wild About New Zealand: A Guide to our National Parks is valued at $55.00 and is available to purchase from book stores nationwide.

Watch Wild About New Zealand On Demand

Start planning your own New Zealand National Park escape

Thanks for all your inspiring comments. The giveaway is now closed and the winners (picked at random) are: Olivia Henwood, Katy Mar and Tom McMurtry.

I hate to send you into a panic, but you might as well know—there are less than 100 days until Christmas. I know, crazy huh? But don’t stop reading in shock. I have something that’ll ease the pain of that announcement. It’s a great present idea that’ll suit just about everyone you know.

New Zealand’s Wild Places is Craig Potton’s new book. You’ve heard of Craig Potton, right? There can’t be too many homes around the country that haven’t had a wall, coffee table, or desk embellished with the work of this well known landscape photographer at some point in time.

Cover of New Zealand's Wild Places by Craig Potton.

Anyway, New Zealand’s Wild Places is Craig’s latest, just released, piece of eye candy; and the wonderful folk at Craig Potton Publishing have given us three copies to give away to you, our lucky and loyal readers.

They’ve been sitting on my desk for a day or two now and, as I thumb (ever so carefully and well away from my coffee cup!), through the pages—covering rivers and lakes, the coast, and forests and mountains—I can’t help but feel a fresh sense of awe at our country’s remarkable landscape (and at Craig Potton’s talent in capturing it in such an honest way).

In the foreword he says:

It is my hope that New Zealand’s Wild Places can serve as a reminder of, and an inspiration for your own encounters with the wild places of our country.

Now, who wouldn’t want to give their family and friends that for Christmas (or at any other time of the year for that matter)?

To be in to win leave a comment on this post before 12 noon on Monday 23 September, telling us about your favourite New Zealand Wild Place.

The giveaway is open to Conservation Blog subscribers; however, we can only ship to New Zealand addresses.

Good luck!


New Zealand’s Wild Places is valued at $39.99 and is available to purchase from bookstores nationwide and online from www.craigpotton.co.nz.

It’s free and easy to subscribe to the Conservation Blog, simply enter your email address in the right hand side of this web page where it says “email notifications”. If you already receive our blog posts via email then you’re already subscribed!

UPDATE: The competition has now ended. 

Kiwi: the real story made it onto the Listener’s 50 Best Children’s Books of 2012 list, and it’s not hard to see why.  The combination of verse, factual text and beautifully luminous pictures, offers a spellbinding glimpse into the secret night-world of our amazing iconic kiwi bird.

Kiwi: the real story would be an amazing Christmas present for any lucky kiwi kid and, thanks to New Holland Publishers, we’ve got three copies to give away here on the Conservation Blog.

Kiwi: the real story

“Muckracker, stem-shaker
nosy parker, mud-larker, dashing darter
cricket-cruncher, mantis-muncher
eavesdropper, clodhopper, show-stopper!”

Kiwi the eavesdropper.

“These feisty birds have a life and spirit of their own and Kiwi: the real story will be the book to inspire your children to love and protect kiwi long into their lifetimes, ensuring that they will still be in the ‘backyards’ of our grandchildren in years to come.”

Kiwi the snail snatcher and beetle battler.

To be in to win a copy, leave a comment on this post before 12 noon, Thursday 20 December 2012, telling us why you want the book. Three winners will be selected at random and contacted by email.

The giveaway is open to everyone, except employees of the Department of Conservation, New Holland Publishers, and their immediate families; however, we can only ship to New Zealand addresses.

Good luck!

Kiwi: the real story is valued at $29.99 and will be available from good bookstores nationwide.

The giveaway is now closed. The lucky winner is kākāpō fan Tania Seward of Auckland, who recently visited our Official Spokesbird for Conservation, Sirocco the kākāpō , at Maungatautari.


Buller’s Birds of New Zealand, edited by Geoff Norman, is without a doubt one of the most beautiful books I’ve laid eyes on and, thanks to Te Papa Press, I have the privilege of giving away a copy here on the Conservation Blog.

“This precious and beautiful book is a perfect celebration of the precious
and beautiful birds of the precious and beautiful islands of Aotearoa.”
Stephen Fry

A memorial to a vanished world

This brand new (launched last month) edition contains the complete set of 95 classic 19th century ornithological paintings by John Gerrard Keulemans, reproduced in the most spectacular colour and detail.

Each painting is a masterpiece that I’d happily frame for my wall (although pulling apart this precious cloth-bound book to do so would be criminal – I might have to buy the calendar or cards for that project!).

Aside from the art, the book also has Buller’s original, descriptive text, as well as up-to-date taxonomic information in English and te reo Māori.

It’s valued at $150 and, on the off chance that you don’t win a copy here, you can purchase it from bookshops nationwide or online at www.tepapastore.co.nz.

Bush wren/mātuhituhi and rock wren/pīwauwau

Be in to win

To be in to win leave a comment on this post before 12 noon, Monday 12 November 2012, telling us why you want the book. A winner will be selected at random and contacted by email.

The giveaway is open to everyone, except employees of the Department of Conservation and their immediate families; however, we can only ship to New Zealand addresses.

Good luck!

Yellowhead/mohua and whitehead/pōpokotea

Stephen Fry says it best…

“There can be no finer example of the pinnacle of Victorian cataloguing than the stupendously fine work of Buller and Keulemans in their monumental collaboration… this wondrous, perfectly fashioned masterpiece marks a kind of dividing line between the old New Zealand of slaughter and extinction and the new New Zealand, which is one of the most conservation-minded, eco-aware and environmentally progressive nations on earth.

“Keulemans’ unprecedentedly detailed and exquisite images of every New Zealand bird that Buller could spot, catch and describe amount to a supreme work of art the like of which it is hard to find anywhere else in the realm of natural history…

“The re-publication by the Te Papa Press of this pioneering work with an exhaustive, deeply researched, highly readable text by Geoff Norman will be welcomed by scholars, field-workers and enthusiasts the world over. It is a memorial to a vanished world and a reminder of the vulnerability of biodiversity – how millions of years of creation can be undone by only a few centuries of destruction.

“I am dizzy with pride at being offered this opportunity to introduce it to you. This precious and beautiful book is a perfect celebration of the precious and beautiful birds of the precious and beautiful islands of Aotearoa.” – Stephen Fry