Archives For Endemic

Threatened species, like the critically threatened herb Chenopodium detestans, are about to get improved profile with the establishment of a new Threatened Species Ambassador role.

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Today’s photo of the week is one of the six new Antipodes Island parakeets that have taken up residence at Pukaha Mount Bruce.

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After a long flight home a pair of jewelled geckos are settling back in to life in New Zealand after they were illegally smuggled to Germany.

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Today’s photo of the week is a boulder copper butterfly — one of the many endemic species of butterfly found in New Zealand.

Boulder copper butterfly. Photo: Jon Sullivan (CC BY-NC 2.0).

Boulder copper butterflies can be found throughout the South Island and in central areas of the North Island, but are more commonly encountered in the upland areas like the Southern Alps and the central plateau.

This beauty was photographed in Canterbury’s Craigieburn Forest Park by Jon Sullivan | CC BY-NC 2.0

Today’s photo of the week is of a red-crowned parakeet/kākāriki taking a bath in a stream in Rotorua. Kākāriki, means ‘small green parrot’ in Māori.

Kakariki taking a bath.

There are five main species of kākāriki. The red-crowned species is distinguished by a bright crimson forehead, crown and a streak extending back beyond the eyes.

Attacks by introduced predators such as stoats and rats are the main threat to kākāriki.

This photo was taken by Jackson WoodCC BY-NC 2.0.

Our photo of the week is this beautiful Powelliphanta snail, a large, air-breathing, carnivorous land snail endemic to New Zealand.

Powelliphanta snail. Photo: John Mason.

Their shells come in an array of colours and patterns, ranging from hues of red and brown to yellow and black. Their favourite prey is earthworms, but they are also known to eat slugs. Powelliphanta snails are an integral part of New Zealand’s unique fauna, and were as important in evolutionary terms as kiwikākāpō or moa.

Predation and habitat loss are the major threats to this species, although their outlook is improving with DOC undertaking work to protect these snails on the West Coast through long-term monitoring, translocation and captive breeding.

This photo that was taken by DOC’s John Mason.