Archives For fur seals

Have you found a seal in an unusual place or it looks injured? Here’s what to do when you find a New Zealand fur seal and why.

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New Zealand’s largest and deepest marine reserve, along with our first whale sanctuary and our first seal sanctuary, came into effect on Friday.

Kaikōura with marine reserve in the background.

Kaikōura with marine reserve in the background.

Five new customary fishing areas, and more sustainable recreational fishing regulations, were also established.

Humpback whale. Photo: Ann McCaw.

Humpback whales pass through Kaikōura on their northern winter migration

The journey began nearly 10 years ago with the establishment of Te Korowai o Te Tai ō Marokura, a group of local people and agencies who recognised that Kaikōura’s magnificent and valuable marine environment was under pressure.

Hutton’s shearwater/tītī. Photo: Graeme A Taylor.

Hutton’s shearwater/tītī

A korowai is a chiefly cloak laid over something to protect and care for it.

The sanctuaries, marine reserve, and fisheries management tools established are each strands of an interwoven cloak that cares for the Kaikōura (Te Tai ō Marokura) Marine Management Area.

Dusky dolphins. Photo: Caroline Wilkins.

Large pods of dusky dolphins live in the vicinity of the Kaikōura Canyon

Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Kaiwhakahaere, Chairman of Te Rūnanga o Kaikōura and Te Korowai member, Tā Mark Solomon says:

“The negotiations were long and hard, but for me the whole process was a beautiful expression of community. I think the whole of New Zealand could look at this as an example of how communities can come together to look after their resources for themselves and their children,” he says.

Dusk at Kaikoura. Photo: Katrin-Lena | flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0.

Dusk

Mā te whakapūmau i te mauri me te wairua o “Te Tai ō
Marokura”, ko mātou ngā kaitiaki o ngā taonga a Tangaroa
kei te arataki i te iwi hapori, ki te whakangaruru i te
momona me te waiora o te āhuatanga o te Taiao, mo ngā
whakatipuranga o aianei me ake tonu ake.

By perpetuating the mauri and wairua of Te Tai ō Marokura
we as kaitiaki of Tangaroa’s tāonga are leading the community to achieve a
flourishing, rich and healthy environment where opportunities
abound to sustain the needs of present and future generations.

(The vision of Te Korowai o Te Tai ō Marokura)

Today’s photo of the week was taken at Taiaroa Head/Pukekura—located on the end of the Otago Peninsula.

Taiaroa Head, Otago.

With nearly 10,000 seabirds residing on Taiaroa Head/Pukekuraincluding the only mainland colony of albatross in the Southern Hemispherethe wildlife viewing opportunities here are immense.

The area is also home to a historic lighthouse (1864) and a number of spectacular coastal walks.

By Laura Boren, Senior Technical Support Officer – Marine Mammals, Department of Conservation

Every winter there will be a few young NZ fur seals who find themselves in interesting places, often to the surprise and amusement of the people who stumble across them.

It’s a common occurrence – they are just coming ashore to rest and will move on in their own time.

This fur seal pup found a cosy position by a spa pool in the Marlborough Sounds community of Anakiwa. The exciting thing for me was that the spa pool belonged to friends of my family. So, on a Sunday afternoon I received an excited phone call from the Biggs family asking me what they should do.

Seal pup relaxing by the spa

“If it’s not interfering with anything just leave it,” I said.

“Enjoy it while it’s there – just give it some space because at this time of the year it might not be in great condition and will want to rest.

“It’ll leave when it’s ready,” I assured them.

Later that day I had an equally excited phone call from my parents. My father had been to see the seal pup and had taken several photos. From the photos we could confirm that it was one of this year’s pups, and was likely to have weaned early – seal pups usually wean around 10 months of age, but this one would only be about 7 months old.

So, the pup hung around for the afternoon, resting next to the warm spa pool and, just as suspected, the following morning was gone.

Read ‘Seal drops in for a spa’ story on www.stuff.co.nz

Watch a video on the DOC website about how the NZ fur seal is making a return from the brink of extinction