Archives For Kaikoura

Tomorrow marks one year since the earth moved in Kaikōura. We’ve had a busy year managing the quake’s impact on native species and conservation areas. We reflect on the last 12 months.

Continue Reading...

During the recent events this week, our thoughts are with the people of Kaikoura and everyone affected by Monday’s quake.

Continue Reading...

Today’s photo of the week is of a young New Zealand fur seal pup at Ohau Stream near Kaikoura.

Continue Reading...

Today’s photo of the week is of a New Zealand fur seal pup. DOC is currently looking for volunteers to help manage visitors to the fur seal colony at Ohau Point, Kaikoura.

Continue Reading...

The Kaikoura large whale disentanglement team was in action last month working to free a humpback whale from a cray pot line entangling it.

Continue Reading...

New Zealand’s largest and deepest marine reserve, along with our first whale sanctuary and our first seal sanctuary, came into effect on Friday.

Kaikōura with marine reserve in the background.

Kaikōura with marine reserve in the background.

Five new customary fishing areas, and more sustainable recreational fishing regulations, were also established.

Humpback whale. Photo: Ann McCaw.

Humpback whales pass through Kaikōura on their northern winter migration

The journey began nearly 10 years ago with the establishment of Te Korowai o Te Tai ō Marokura, a group of local people and agencies who recognised that Kaikōura’s magnificent and valuable marine environment was under pressure.

Hutton’s shearwater/tītī. Photo: Graeme A Taylor.

Hutton’s shearwater/tītī

A korowai is a chiefly cloak laid over something to protect and care for it.

The sanctuaries, marine reserve, and fisheries management tools established are each strands of an interwoven cloak that cares for the Kaikōura (Te Tai ō Marokura) Marine Management Area.

Dusky dolphins. Photo: Caroline Wilkins.

Large pods of dusky dolphins live in the vicinity of the Kaikōura Canyon

Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Kaiwhakahaere, Chairman of Te Rūnanga o Kaikōura and Te Korowai member, Tā Mark Solomon says:

“The negotiations were long and hard, but for me the whole process was a beautiful expression of community. I think the whole of New Zealand could look at this as an example of how communities can come together to look after their resources for themselves and their children,” he says.

Dusk at Kaikoura. Photo: Katrin-Lena | flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0.

Dusk

Mā te whakapūmau i te mauri me te wairua o “Te Tai ō
Marokura”, ko mātou ngā kaitiaki o ngā taonga a Tangaroa
kei te arataki i te iwi hapori, ki te whakangaruru i te
momona me te waiora o te āhuatanga o te Taiao, mo ngā
whakatipuranga o aianei me ake tonu ake.

By perpetuating the mauri and wairua of Te Tai ō Marokura
we as kaitiaki of Tangaroa’s tāonga are leading the community to achieve a
flourishing, rich and healthy environment where opportunities
abound to sustain the needs of present and future generations.

(The vision of Te Korowai o Te Tai ō Marokura)

Today’s photo of the week is of two humpback whales and a pod of dusky dolphins travelling near the Kaikoura Coast.

humpback-whales

The Department of Conservation is currently conducting a research project that monitors the northern migration of humpback whales through the Cook Strait. This will be the eleventh annual Cook Strait Whale Survey.

The survey aims to determine how humpback whales are recovering since whaling ended. The survey has already recorded 33 humpback whales and 1 blue whale.

This photo was taken by Rob Pine.