Archives For Glamping

By DOC Ranger, Kurt Shanks

Today, we’re putting the spotlight on recent innovative activity on Motuihe Island — a conservation jewel in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf Marine Park.

Ranger John Mills plays a vital role in everything from glamping to gecko translocations and sponsored road repairs.

Donation benefits conservation

A $2,000 donation of roading materials and labour from Fulton Hogan provided an unexpected boost to conservation efforts on Motuihe.

Paul Hart (left) from Fulton Hogan and DOC’s Motuihe  Ranger John Mills, on the road before repairs were  carried out.

Paul Hart (left) from Fulton Hogan and DOC’s Motuihe
Ranger John Mills, on the road before repairs were
carried out

A donated truck load of black top roading mix has enabled DOC to make the necessary repairs to the deteriorating road surface, with spin-off conservation benefits.

DOC Ranger on the island, John Mills, says the donated materials and labour allow DOC and its partner—the Motuihe Island Restoration Trust—to divert more budget and effort to projects with direct conservation benefits.

The island is pest free, with continued effort by DOC and the Trust to protect endangered native species like the New Zealand dotterelsaddlebackkākārikikiwishore skinksbellbirds and tuatara.

Crossing the ditch for Motuihe glamping

John Mills says there is also increasing interest from the corporate sector to visit the island for retreats, conservation education and team building.

    The lounge retreat, part of the glamping site on Motuihe Island


The lounge retreat, part of the glamping site on Motuihe Island

In early November the island hosted 60 high-achievers from Fuji Xerox Australia for an overnight ‘glamping’ experience.

The overnighter was organised by wildernest.co.nz who booked out camp sites on the island and ensured guests’ meals were fully catered by chefs.

The spectacular glamping site on Motuihe Island.

The spectacular glamping site on Motuihe Island

The Fuji Xerox staff helped DOC and the Trust by carrying out a variety of conservation-orientated volunteer work, and the island was returned to its original condition immediately prior to the guests’ departure, with all rubbish and temporary facilities removed by barge.

Trifecta of gecko translocations—two down, one to go!

Three species of gecko are being translocated to Motuihe over the summer months to help restore ecological links and values to the island.

Releasing geckos

Releasing geckos

The gecko programme is part of the island’s restoration plan jointly developed by DOC and the Trust, and follows several translocations of rare birds and tuatara.

Geckos were present on the island prior to farming and the arrival of pest animals.

Late last year, 60 common geckos arrived from Otata Island (Noises) to Motuihe on a day which attracted more than 100 volunteers and conservationists, including iwi, the Trust, DOC and community groups.

60 common geckos arrived from Otata Island, which attracted more than 100 volunteers and conservationists

60 common geckos arrived from Otata Island, which attracted more than 100 volunteers and conservationists

In January 100 Duvaucel’s geckos arrived from Stanley Island (in the Mercury Islands), and in early March 100 Pacific geckos will be translocated from Tarakihi (**** Island).

Visit Motuihe

With clear waters, sheltered anchorages, visitor facilities and community conservation efforts, the island is particularly popular with summer visitors.

You can plan your own visit to Motuihe on the DOC website.

Abby Hamilton in Aoraki National Park.

Abby Hamilton

Abby Hamilton

Position and office:
Ranger, Community Relations, Visitor Centre, Aoraki/Mt Cook.

Are you a Family camper, a Glamper, or a Wilderness wanderer?
A Wilderness wanderer (in a tent or the back of the car), and my goal is to holiday in my caravan in secluded spots, like in the picture below (friends’ and family’s properties in the wilderness, and DOC sites etc..), more often!

Abby's caravan she used to live in.

The caravan that Abby used to live in while studying at Lincoln University

Arna Litchfield

Position and office:
Permissions Advisor, Hamilton Shared Service Centre

Are you a Family camper, a Glamper, or a Wilderness wanderer?
I don’t often get out camping, but did have an awesome long weekend at Matai Bay a few years back with friends. While I could handle the cold showers while I was there, I was a very happy lady when I got home and got back to hot water…. So I would say that I’d have a tendancy to glamp where the opportunity is there 🙂

Arna on Cooks Beach.

Arna and a couple of friends at Cooks Beach last summer

Simon Mazzotti

Position and office:
Ranger, Visitor Information, Mt Aspiring National Park Visitor Centre (Wanaka).

Are you a Family camper, a Glamper, or a Wilderness wanderer?
A mix of Wilderness wanderer (when I’m away on my own) and car-camper (when I have to make a few comfort concessions to convince friends to join in).

Cricket on the Wanaka lakefront.

Simon and his mates play cricket at Lake Wanaka

Are you keen to discover your inner camper? Do you want that quintessential kiwi summer camping experience but not too sure how to make it happen or where to go? DOC is here to make it happen!

Discover your inner camper this summer.

Discover your inner camper this summer

DOC campsites cater to a range of campers and camping styles; from lush forest settings, to sandy beaches and shimmering lakes. You can camp in scenic surroundings from as little as $6 per adult per night – or even experience one of our free campsites around the country.

DOC signs on display at a campsite near Craigieburn Forest Park.

Great locations mean there is plenty to see and do

We all have a different image in our minds of what the New Zealand camping experience entails and your own camping getaway will probably depend on your own inner camper type that is waiting to be unleashed.

Whether you are the true outdoors type who likes roughing it, a family of campers who will make the most of camping sites with plenty to see and do, right through to the top end of the scale – “glampers” who don’t want to use a long drop and would rather not go without a shower.

A family play with a cricket set outside their tent.

Don’t forget the cricket set!

So what you are waiting for? Find your own unique camper within!

What you need to know:

• Campsites are divided into categories, based on the facilities provided.

• They are dirt cheap! You’ll pay around $6-$15 per person per night for one of our sought-after campsites, or you can even rough it free of charge in a basic campsite.

• Bookings are required for all Serviced campsites and for some Scenic and Standard campsites in peak season (usually 1 October – 30 April). Most bookings can be made online or at a DOC visitor centre.

• Access to these sites can vary, so make sure you check whether your campervan or motor home can climb that steep gravel road.

• There are campsites in pretty much any setting you desire: by the coast, in the forest, next to rivers and lakes or below huge mountains.

• Sometimes they may be hard to find, but many campsites are in spectacular locations, just waiting for you to find them.

You can download the comprehensive North Island and South Island camping brochures from the DOC website, or drop into any DOC visitor centre to grab a copy for the car glove box.

Brochures are available for camp sites in the North and South Island.

Brochures are available for camp sites in the North and South Island

Check out our summer camping page for more information then find the perfect campsite, get your gear sorted, and go out and enjoy a legendary New Zealand camping experience.